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Blog posts tagged with 'immune system'

Nothing Fishy About Fish Oil

Meditation relieves stress, improve circulation

Getting your proper intake of omega-3s can be tricky, especially if you’re not a lover of fish. One of the most important nutrients for health, it benefits overall wellness, including the heart, the immune system, brain health and more. However, much of the Western diet is lacking in omega-3s, replaced by the omega-6 fatty acids. An excess of omega-6s can cause inflammation, and can even lead to serious health risks.

Benefits from Top to Bottom

With American Heart Month coming up in February, it’s important to know that omega-3s are essential for good heart health. Several studies have demonstrated how people that eat a plentiful amount of fish have lower rates of heart risks. Fish oil also helps increase the good levels of cholesterol, also known as HDL. It can help reduce blood pressure and lower triglycerides.

It’s also a benefit for your mental health. The brain is made up of around 60% fat, which are mainly omega-3s. Research has shown that a proper amount of fish oil intake can prevent the onset of certain mental disorders. It’s also just handy for boosting normal brain function in general.

Weight management is a constant struggle for many, and fish oil can be a big help. Studies have shown that enough fish oil intake can help induce weight loss when in conjunction with dieting and exercise. Fish oil also has inflammatory properties, which helps out the immune system and general health.

The benefits are even more numerous, supporting healthy skin, early pregnancy, improving bone health, and even boosting your mood. But where best can you get your fill of omega-3s?

A Meal Rich in Omega-3s

Meditation relieves stress, improve circulation

  • Fish: A majority of fish oil comes from, you guessed it, fish. Foods such as salmon, mackerel and anchovies contain omega-3s, which makes up 30% of fish oil. It also contains important vitamins A and D, which helps boost the immune system and maintains healthy bone growth respectively. Mackerel specifically contains more than 3300 mg of omega-3s per serving, which is nearly 6 times the recommended daily dose for adults.
  • Nuts and Seeds: If fish isn’t part of your palate however, there are other foods to rely on. Walnuts are full of healthy fats which include omega-3s. They can go with nearly any meal, such as with fruits, in salads, or even baked into your favorite desserts. Flaxseeds are also a source for a specific omega-3 called alpha-linoleic acid or ALA, which the body cannot make on its own. They’re perfect for a breakfast meal, or can be blended into fruit smoothies. Cashew nuts are very flavorful, but more than that, they are full of omega-3s, making them a valuable snack.
  • Vegetables: Don’t be picky with your vegetables, because omega-3s are abound in them as well. Brussels sprouts may not be everyone’s most favorite, but it contains potent amounts of vitamin K and vitamin C, along with omega-3s. Spinach is another, and can be added most meals without affecting the flavor. Broccoli is also a big source of ALA, as well as being high in fiber, zinc and protein.
  • Oils: Adding certain oils to your meals can also help you reach your omega-3 goals. Canola oil is low in saturated fats and is very mild tasting. Other healthy oils include walnut oil, flaxseed oil and olive oil, which all have healthy servings of omega-3s.

Omega-3 Fish Oil: A Convenient Source of Helpful Fatty Acids

Despite the many health applications of fish oil, our diets don’t allow for much opportunity to have some. Omega-3 Fish Oil by GardaVita® can supply a high-quality source of omega-3s in easy-to-swallow softgels. They include two of the most important fatty acids, EPA and DHA. Get a convenient serving to help manage your overall health. There’s nothing fishy about good health!

Click here to Try Omega-3 Fish Oil today!

 

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Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Dreaming

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Facts You Probably Didn't Know About DreamingEvery night you venture from this world into an entirely different one where the rules of physics, time, and mortality may not apply. It sometimes doesn't help that while you're inhabiting this world, you are unable to exercise any control over your dream land. However, that can be part of the fun. Where does this all occur? In the mind, of course.

Dreams as a Means of Memory Processing

Sleep and dreaming helps your mind process, sort, and store each day's events. Rubin Naiman, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist specializing in integrative sleep and dream medicine at the University of Arizona, likens dreaming to being a digestive system for your brain. "At night, the brain metaphorically swallows, digests, and sifts through information, and, just like the gut, eliminates," he says. "What the brain keeps becomes a part of who we are. Dreaming, is like the brain's digestive system."

Dreams are often said to occur only during the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) cycles of sleep. But according to Dr. Naiman, dreams actually happen all night long; it's just that you're more tuned in to them during the REM cycles. Interestingly, mammals, reptiles, and birds are the only animals that experience REM sleep.

The process of sleep also helps the brain rid itself of toxic proteins that may potentially affect neurological function. The brain has its own plumbing system—known as the glymphatic system—that carries waste material out of the brain nightly. During sleep, brain cells shrink, allowing fluids to wash out the brain.

Want to Remember Your Dreams?

Trying to remember some dreams can be like catching smoke with a butterfly net. Sometimes the more you chase after it the more elusive it can become. The best way to try and remember your dream is to wake up slowly, lying in bed for a few moments and staying with your grogginess. By contrast, getting jolted awake by your alarm or any sudden sound can cause you to immediately forget what you were just doing in your dream. The shock of going from one state of mind to the next can leave you with only the vague residual memory of your night's adventures.

People who tend to remember their dreams have been found to have more spontaneous brain activity in a part of the brain called the temporo-parietal junction, when compared to those who more easily forget their dreams. These differences in recalling dreams don't just occur during sleep; people who remember dreams also seem to be more sensitive to sounds while they're asleep, too.

The Connection from Dream Land to the Waking World

Your body reacts the same way in your dreams biologically as it does to reality, says Dr. Naiman. "The experience we have in the dream registers in the body and in the brain in almost exactly the same way," he says. "Your blood pressure or heart rate might spike, for example, like in a real-life stressful scenario, helping to cement those emotional experiences of the dream." Contrary to popular belief, dreams also register in real time and can span anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour.

The realistic feel of dreams can extend to your awake self. A 2014 study found that many bad dreams elicited feelings of worry, confusion, and guilt. However, dreams never feel "weird" no matter how preposterous the situation you're in. "It's only after you wake up and step into the waking world and look at the dream that it seems weird," Dr. Naiman says.

A Good Night's Rest for a Multitude of Benefits

A good night's sleep will take you to imaginative realms but also gives your brain time to digest, sift and sort through information, while leaving you well rested for the morning. Sleep is also connected to other bodily functions such as your immune system, blood pressure, and even weight. Getting the proper amount of sleep, and enjoying the fantastical world of your dreams can keep you living healthy and happy during the day.

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