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Blog posts tagged with 'free-radicals'

Combat Oxidative Stress With Antioxidants

We hear that antioxidants are good for us, but the reasons why are not always clear. Free radicals and oxidative stress are some of the most important terms to learn when it comes to antioxidants. For your nutrition, these little fighters can make or break the balance that is your health. But how do they work, and where can you get your antioxidants in the first place?

Getting the Details on Oxidative Stress

The body constantly goes through a process called oxidation. It metabolizes the oxygen that we breathe in, which helps the cells produce energy. However, along with energy, free-radicals are also created. As they make contact with the molecules within the cells, it can result in damage to the mitochondria, our DNA, and other cells nearby.

Free radicals, however, can be useful to the body. Though they may cause damage, they also stimulate repair in the cells, vital for keeping your health in good balance. It’s when free radicals are produced too quickly that it can become a hazard to the body, resulting in more damaged cells than healthy, repaired ones. This is called oxidative stress, when oxidation is far outweighing the balance of your health.

Oxidation itself can occur for several reasons: When your cells use glucose for energy, when your immune system fights off bacteria, and when the body detoxifies pollutants. Yet, when your body is stressed, physically or emotionally, this can increase oxidation. This can be caused by outside pollution, cigarette smoking, alcoholic consumption, and infection. Once the amount of free radicals produced outnumber the antioxidants in your body, it becomes oxidative stress.

Do You Have Oxidative Stress?

The signs of oxidative stress can vary, but some of the most common include:

  • Fatigue
  • Memory loss
  • Muscle or joint discomfort
  • Headaches
  • Wrinkles and grey hair
  • Worsening eye sight

To avoid oxidative stress, you need to avoid unnecessary oxidation. Stress can increase the frequency of the oxidation process, along with sugary and processed foods, as the cells produce energy with the help of sugar/glucose. It is also important to increase your consumption of antioxidants, which help block oxidation. While antioxidants are naturally present in your body, you can get them from outside sources to help regain the balance.

The Power of Antioxidants

Antioxidants are the molecules in your body that fight back against free radicals, neutralizing the damage they cause. They do so by giving electrons to the free radicals, which prevents them from causing any more harm. When there’s not enough antioxidants, free radicals can run rampant, causing constant damage to the cells.

Combat Oxidantive Stress With AntioxidantsWhile the human body generates antioxidants, like glutathione, you can get your fill from foods and supplements. Some famous antioxidants are Vitamin C and E, which you can find most in plant-based food, usually of the berry variety.

Some antioxidant-rich foods include:

  • Blackberries
  • Cranberries
  • Strawberries
  • Cherries
  • Raspberries
  • Walnuts
  • Pecans
  • Dark chocolate

Certain meat products and fish also have antioxidants in them, though smaller than what is usually found in fruits and vegetables. They are also present in beverages such as tea, and even coffee.

OxyPlus, an Antioxidant-Rich Supplement

A balance of antioxidants is what your body needs to stay healthy and functioning. OxyPlus provides that with its unique blend of ingredients, such as the familiar Vitamin C and Vitamin E, along with the unique Oxyplex blend. Extracts from red wine, green tea and grape seed help make up the blend, creating a fortified supplement that delivers the necessary antioxidants to your body. To beat the oxidative stress, antioxidants are the key to de-stressing, giving your cells the protection it needs.

Click here to Try OxyPlus today!

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The Missing Part to a Balanced Diet

Fruits and VegetablesAre You Eating Enough Fruits and Veggies?

As adults, it’s time to take responsibility – and realize that our parents may have been onto something when they said to finish our greens. Unfortunately, too many have us haven’t taken that advice to heart. Recent studies have shown that only 1 in 10 Americans meet the federal fruit and vegetable recommendations. You usually need 1½ to 2 cups per day for fruit and 2 to 3 cups for vegetables. Yet only 9% of adults eat enough vegetables, and 12% even get enough fruit. If you’re one of those adults skipping past the salad bar, it’s time to take action.

The Missing Part to a Balanced Diet

There’s a reason you should care about fruits and vegetables. Many important vitamins and minerals are in these food types more than others. Potassium, vitamin C, vitamin A and folate are just some of the more common nutrients that you can mainly get from plant-based food, and are beneficial to the body. For example, potassium can help maintain blood pressure. Folate builds up the red blood cells while helps stave off birth defects in pregnant women. Vitamin A promotes healthier eyes and skin, vitamin E protects from free-radicals, and vitamin C supports healthier gums and helps the body absorb iron. 

One other vital nutrient is fiber, and you get plenty of that from fruits and vegetables. Fiber is perfect for weight management, as it helps you feel full faster, while also lowering your blood cholesterol. It is also important for a healthy digestive system for regular bowel movements. Fruits and vegetables are also quite low in fat, sodium and calories, another great use for weight management.

But perhaps one of the most important aspects of this food group is their richness in phytonutrients – which are certain extracts that are only available in fruits and vegetables. 

Getting Your Share of PhytonutrientsFruits and Vegetables

Phytonutrients are known as the protective effects on fruits and vegetables, and many have shown their worth in helping ward off health complications in our own bodies. These phytonutrients are what gives fruits and vegetables their taste, scent and color. As many work like antioxidants, fruits and vegetables can very well protect your body from free-radicals and keep your cells healthy. Some examples of phytonutrients are:

Carotenoids: Present in carrots, broccoli and spinach, carotenoids are antioxidants that give these foods their bright colors. This phytonutrient is a boon to the immune system, while also showing positive impact for good eye health. 

Capsaicin: Peppers are rich in this nutrient and have shown benefits in reducing clotting for better heart health.

Curcumin: A phytonutrient that is rich in the turmeric spice. It is an anti-inflammatory agent, as well as antioxidant, that is commonly used in joint health.



Click here to try Phytoplex today!

 

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