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Blog posts tagged with 'fish oil'

Nothing Fishy About Fish Oil

Meditation relieves stress, improve circulation

Getting your proper intake of omega-3s can be tricky, especially if you’re not a lover of fish. One of the most important nutrients for health, it benefits overall wellness, including the heart, the immune system, brain health and more. However, much of the Western diet is lacking in omega-3s, replaced by the omega-6 fatty acids. An excess of omega-6s can cause inflammation, and can even lead to serious health risks.

Benefits from Top to Bottom

With American Heart Month coming up in February, it’s important to know that omega-3s are essential for good heart health. Several studies have demonstrated how people that eat a plentiful amount of fish have lower rates of heart risks. Fish oil also helps increase the good levels of cholesterol, also known as HDL. It can help reduce blood pressure and lower triglycerides.

It’s also a benefit for your mental health. The brain is made up of around 60% fat, which are mainly omega-3s. Research has shown that a proper amount of fish oil intake can prevent the onset of certain mental disorders. It’s also just handy for boosting normal brain function in general.

Weight management is a constant struggle for many, and fish oil can be a big help. Studies have shown that enough fish oil intake can help induce weight loss when in conjunction with dieting and exercise. Fish oil also has inflammatory properties, which helps out the immune system and general health.

The benefits are even more numerous, supporting healthy skin, early pregnancy, improving bone health, and even boosting your mood. But where best can you get your fill of omega-3s?

A Meal Rich in Omega-3s

Meditation relieves stress, improve circulation

  • Fish: A majority of fish oil comes from, you guessed it, fish. Foods such as salmon, mackerel and anchovies contain omega-3s, which makes up 30% of fish oil. It also contains important vitamins A and D, which helps boost the immune system and maintains healthy bone growth respectively. Mackerel specifically contains more than 3300 mg of omega-3s per serving, which is nearly 6 times the recommended daily dose for adults.
  • Nuts and Seeds: If fish isn’t part of your palate however, there are other foods to rely on. Walnuts are full of healthy fats which include omega-3s. They can go with nearly any meal, such as with fruits, in salads, or even baked into your favorite desserts. Flaxseeds are also a source for a specific omega-3 called alpha-linoleic acid or ALA, which the body cannot make on its own. They’re perfect for a breakfast meal, or can be blended into fruit smoothies. Cashew nuts are very flavorful, but more than that, they are full of omega-3s, making them a valuable snack.
  • Vegetables: Don’t be picky with your vegetables, because omega-3s are abound in them as well. Brussels sprouts may not be everyone’s most favorite, but it contains potent amounts of vitamin K and vitamin C, along with omega-3s. Spinach is another, and can be added most meals without affecting the flavor. Broccoli is also a big source of ALA, as well as being high in fiber, zinc and protein.
  • Oils: Adding certain oils to your meals can also help you reach your omega-3 goals. Canola oil is low in saturated fats and is very mild tasting. Other healthy oils include walnut oil, flaxseed oil and olive oil, which all have healthy servings of omega-3s.

Omega-3 Fish Oil: A Convenient Source of Helpful Fatty Acids

Despite the many health applications of fish oil, our diets don’t allow for much opportunity to have some. Omega-3 Fish Oil by GardaVita® can supply a high-quality source of omega-3s in easy-to-swallow softgels. They include two of the most important fatty acids, EPA and DHA. Get a convenient serving to help manage your overall health. There’s nothing fishy about good health!

Click here to Try Omega-3 Fish Oil today!

 

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Going Beyond the Numbers: Learn How You Can Support Good Cholesterol

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Going Beyond the Numbers: Learn How You Can Support Good CholesterolCholesterol has been a major focus of daily health for many years, especially when it comes to the heart. For a long time doctors and experts focused on a certain set of numbers based on LDL, HDL, and triglyceride levels to assess heart health. But recent studies have shown that cholesterol management is more than just a numbers game.

A Change in Approach

Almost everyone who watches their cholesterol knows there are two different types: LDL, otherwise known as "bad cholesterol", and HDL, known as the "good cholesterol". According to the Mayo Clinic, acceptable ranges for LDL cholesterol consist of anything below 70 mg/dl while anything between 130 mg/dl and 159 mg/dl is borderline high. For the good HDL, the higher the number the better. Healthy ranges consist of anything between 40 mg/dl up to 60 mg/dl.

A recent report released by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, however, gave updated insight into how other potential risk factors—not just cholesterol numbers—play a role in determining your cholesterol health. Cholesterol numbers by themselves sometimes don't always tell the full tale as the same numerical values can bear different meanings for different people.

In order to give a more accurate evaluation, doctors and health experts looked at other factors such as genetics, age, physical activity levels, diet, and blood sugar levels to assess what type of daily support an individual may need. Any one of these factors can raise your risk of heart concerns, which is why it's important not to focus on a single aspect, but rather the big picture of your well-being.

Ways You Can Influence Your Cholesterol Numbers

There are several controllable factors that you can engage in to support not just your cholesterol number readings, but other aspects that go into your health. Diet, for instance, can play a crucial role. Studies have shown that legumes can positively influence your cholesterol numbers. Foods like beans, nuts, peas, and lentils can cut cholesterol by 5%, which, in turn, can cut your risk factors for other heart health concerns by 5%, making a world of difference.

There are also supplementation options for a more natural approach to supporting cholesterol. The clinically tested Bergamot fruit continues to show promise for cholesterol health as well as balancing blood sugar levels. Other ingredients such as folic acid, omega-3 fish oil, and flaxseed have also shown the ability to provide positive daily support when it comes to managing cholesterol.

Depending on your personal variables, exercise is another often-cited factor in influencing cholesterol health. You don't have to dedicate yourself to workouts to see a difference, but adding 30–40 minutes of moderate-intensity workouts three-to-four times a week can support healthy cholesterol and blood pressure ranges according to the American Heart Association.

Other lifestyle components include resisting more obvious bad habits such as smoking and drinking too much alcohol, as well as not monitoring stress levels as they can impact blood pressure and your overall heart health.

It's More Than Just About the Numbers

While many people measure their cholesterol strictly by the numbers, there's much more to it than figures on a piece of paper. Your overall lifestyle—depending on how healthy or unhealthy it is—indirectly affects your heart. However, no matter your age, weight, gender, or family history, it's never too late to enact positive changes starting today that can bear great health rewards tomorrow.

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Three Powerful Supplements Are Leading the Way in Joint Health – Are You on Board?

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Three Powerful Supplements Are Leading the Way in Joint Health – Are You on Board?Many people today experience some form of bone and joint discomfort. Even if you don't have a physically demanding job, your chances of dealing with joint discomfort—from mild stiffness to constant soreness during everyday activities—can increase throughout your lifetime simply from normal use. However, while you may initially assume that joint discomfort is an inevitable part of aging, more and more health experts are saying this doesn't need to be the case.

What's Really Happening?

The main cause for discomfort begins in the joints. The space between the bones needs cushioning to prevent bones from rubbing up against each other at the points of contact. Buffering these joints is the all-important substance, cartilage. Cartilage is a connective tissue that can be found throughout the body: From your ears, to your nose, to your rib cage, and the vertebrae in your back. This fibrous tissue keeps your body structure together, yet provides flexibility and mobility you need. The first step in attempting to find relief is to understand what's really going on in your bones and joints. According to Raymond Gaeta, M.D., of the Stanford Hospital & Clinic at Stanford University, people are used to the body healing itself naturally, so they always expect that to happen. In reality, similar to how a car requires regular maintenance and lubrication, keeping your bones and joints healthy at any age involves proper nutrition, consisting of vitamins and nutrients that help strengthen and lubricate them. Lack of these nutrients can start to manifest as symptoms of discomfort that “affects how you handle your life, your livelihood, and your interactions with family and friends,” according to Dr. Gaeta.

The Power of Three: Glucosamine, Chondroitin, and Fish Oil

Besides supplementing your diet with the usual FDA-recommended vitamins and minerals, your bones and joints can also benefit from other joint health ingredients. Glucosamine, chondroitin, and fish oil are three joint health supplements that can provide some of the best mobility support and discomfort relief available. Glucosamine has been shown in studies to maintain the integrity of your joints by strengthening cartilage. It has been shown that the body uses glucosamine to help synthesize and repair cartilage. Glucosamine has also been shown to be highly beneficial for keeping cartilage tissue lubricated, allowing for better mobility and flexibility in joints. When taken as a supplement it has shown evidence of relieving discomfort due to inflammation as well. Chondroitin sulfate is also naturally found in the cartilage. It acts as a building material by donating sulfur bonds that are used in cartilage production. As a supplement, chondroitin is commonly partnered with glucosamine to help relieve inflammation that can lead to discomfort, and support cartilage production and repair. Fish oil contains the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, which have also been found to help ease inflammation in joint tissue. In a recent, large-scale research study published in the Journal of Epidemiology it was found that regular use of glucosamine, chondroitin, and fish oil supplements can reduce markers of inflammation by up to 22%. In addition to being highly effective, the researchers also noted that the supplements were highly safe to take.

The Right Nutrition for Protection

A recent survey found that nearly 1 in 5 (19%) American adults were experiencing joint discomfort. Among these people surveyed, half did not know what caused their discomfort. If you're one of these people, pinpointing where these concerns might come from and learning what you can do to support the health of your joints, bones, and cartilage can rejuvenate the healthy lifestyle you desire. Discomfort and mobility challenges do not have to be an accepted part of aging. Getting your mobility and flexibility back can be within your control. Support your joint health and fuel your body the right nutrients today!


Triple-Strength Glucosamine Chondroitin
 

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Taking Control Over Your Cholesterol Leads to Healthier Heart Support, No Matter Your Age

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High Density Helpers and Low Density Cloggers

Taking Control Over Your Cholesterol Leads to Healthier Heart Support, No Matter Your AgeDid you know there are 2 types of cholesterol? And while they both can affect each other, one is good for you and one is bad? Cholesterol is a waxy substance produced by the liver for cells, membranes and metabolism and is needed in order to create hormones, vitamin D and the bile acid that helps you digest fat. The good cholesterol is known as high density lipoprotein or HDL. Your HDL cholesterol acts as the street sweeper of your blood vessels. They clean the walls of your blood vessels, and support a healthy heart and good circulation.

Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the bad cholesterol flowing through the bloodstream that tends to deposit on the walls of arteries. Collecting in the blood vessels and accumulating over time, LDL cholesterol can contribute to poor circulation and is thought to be a significant contributor for many heart related concerns for adults as they continue to mature. HDL helps lower LDL levels by gathering up the bad cholesterol but overall the body only needs a limited amount of cholesterol, beyond that is a cause for further health issues.

Numbers Game

You can monitor your cholesterol levels by taking a cholesterol test or lipid panel. Looking at your genetics or family history can be an indicator as to your cholesterol, as well as looking at your diet, how active you are, and your habits (smoking, tobacco use, medications.) The average recommended cholesterol levels, range from 100-120 for HDL and around 60 or above for LDL. It is usually advised to keep your total cholesterol number around 200 or below. Ways to stay away from high cholesterol numbers include keeping a diet low in saturated fats, trans-fats, and sugars, as well as avoiding foods that are high in cholesterol content themselves - such as burgers and cheese fries - as these can all increase your LDL cholesterol.

Taking Action to Heart

While staying away from the bad, you can take on the good to help support healthier cholesterol levels. Fish, walnuts, almonds and other nuts that are rich in polyunsaturated fats are beneficial because of their omega-3 fatty acid content which has been proven to help support lower triglyceride levels and better HDL numbers. Fruits and vegetables that specifically contain plant sterols or stanols can help block your body’s absorption of cholesterol. But you can’t always get everything your body needs directly from your diet, supplementing your nutrition directly with fish oil, or flaxseed oil and borage oil as a vegetarian option, can help provide you with a healthy amount of omega-3 fatty acids. The B vitamin niacin can also provide support for healthy HDL levels and works best in junction with a low cholesterol-focused diet. Combining a healthy diet, proper supplementation, and at least 30 minutes a day of exercise can help support higher HDL levels and combat LDL cholesterol. The road to a healthy heart runs through your blood vessels. Help keep your heart’s highways clean by taking the necessary steps towards healthier levels cholesterol levels, no matter your age. Today is the perfect day to begin a healthier lifestyle!


Triple Omega 3-6-9
 

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Being Mindful of Your Brain’s Nutrition

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Being Mindful of Your Brain’s NutritionWe are a health-aware generation who has been enlightened by scientists with the knowledge good nutrition supports a healthy body. Recently, the scientific community has been interested in shedding light on how better nutrition can benefit and support brain health, too. The human brain is one of the most complex organs in your body and scientists have only just begun to scratch the surface of the best nutritional ways to support brain and cognitive function.

Taking Nutritional Support Straight to the Brain

The years of research have been anything but fruitless. Many studies point to evidence that supplementation can also support brain health and cognitive function. Dr. Perry Renshaw, professor of psychiatry at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Director of the Magnetic Resonance Laboratory at the Brain Institute at the University of Utah, explains, "accumulating evidence suggests that not only better overall nutrition, but also supplementation with several key nutrients may help stave off the reduced efficiency of brain cells that occurs with aging." To help you get started, we've listed some of these foods and nutrients below.

The B Vitamins

The B vitamins are an excellent source of nutrients to support brain health and overall health. Thiamin, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 have all shown promise in supporting brain health. In fact, particular levels of these vitamins are paramount for the efficient metabolism of glucose, the brain's primary fuel, which is why you require daily supplementation of these vitamins.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants are another key source to help maintain brain vitality and cognitive function. They help protect the body from free radicals that attack healthy cells and are said to help reduce levels of oxidative stress. Vitamins E and C, and compounds such as alpha-lipoic acid, coenzyme Q10, Ginkgo biloba, and fruit polyphenols have also been studied for their potential benefits to brain health.

"Good" Fats

At first glance this seems like a contradictive statement. Nevertheless, many studies have shown that healthy fatty acids not only promote heart health, but brain health as well. Healthy fatty acids can come from vegetable sources such as corn oil, safflower oil, soybean oil, and peanuts, as well as from certain fatty fish such as tuna, salmon, and herring. Olive oil and many different types of tree nuts are also sources of "good" fats. If these foods sound familiar it is because they are staples of the popular "Mediterranean diet" which is said to be one of the most effective diets to support cognitive health. As knowledge of the human mind and its functions expands, hopefully so will the importance that people place on supporting their brains as well as their bodies. Understanding the necessity of good nutrition for overall health is paramount. A healthy diet, regular physical and mental activity, and supplementation of key nutrients will help keep you on the path of healthy aging so you can focus your mind on living and enjoying life.

References:

  • Rutberg S. Supps better than sudoku for aging brain? Newhope360. https://newhope360.com/breaking-news/supps-better-sudoku-aging-brain?cid=nl_npi_daily
  • Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. National Academy Press, Washington, DC; 1998.
  • Behl C. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease: implications for prevention and therapy. Subcell Biochem. 2005;38:65-78
  • Panza F et al. Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline. Public Health Nutr. 2004;7(7):959-63.

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