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Blog posts tagged with 'calcium'

Vitamin D and Calcium: Your Double Dose of Healthy Bone Support

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Every single day, your body derives a number of nutrients from the food and drink you consume in order to maintain overall health and wellness. Calcium and vitamin D are two such essential nutrients that pose multiple health benefits to your body in addition to helping support healthy bones and joints. Both nutrients are essential to building strong, dense bones and to keeping them that way as you age.

As one of the most common minerals in the body, calcium is essential for maintaining the bone mass necessary to support the skeletal system. In addition to bone health, calcium helps support heart health, and proper functioning of muscles and nerves. Studies have also suggested that calcium, along with vitamin D, may have benefits beyond bone health: including cellular health, blood pressure support, and sugar levels.

Vitamin D also plays an important role in bone and muscle health. The body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Insufficient vitamin D levels in turn lead to insufficient calcium absorption from the diet. When this happens, the body tends to take calcium from the bones, weakening existing bones and preventing the formation of strong, new bones in the process.

It is estimated that only 32% of adults in the U.S. receive enough calcium from their diet alone. If your own diet is lacking, you can fix that up by making different food choices that will keep your bones strong instead of brittle.


Boost Up Your Diet for a Stronger You

Bone loss accelerates more and more as we grow older, which is why a steady dose of calcium can help keep such progression at bay. The recommended daily intake for calcium is 1,000 milligrams a day for adults up through age 50, while for those 51 and older, it’s 1,200 mg a day. However, sometimes drinking milk isn’t enough. The kidneys start to lose their efficiency at conserving calcium over the years, and the intestines begin to absorb less calcium from a regular diet alone.

This is why both supplementation and eating the right foods is important. By enhancing your diet with various calcium and Vitamin D enriched foods, in conjunction with a bone-health supplement such as OsteoNourish®, you can maintain healthy bones and muscles that will help you maintain an active and comfortable lifestyle. 

Calcium rich foodsFor calcium-rich foods:

  • Dark, leafy greens, such as kale, argula, watercress and collard greens.
  • Dairy products such as milk, yogurt and cheese.
  • Food products fortified with calcium including certain juices, breakfast foods, cereals, snacks and breads.

For vitamin D-rich foods:

  • Fatty fish such as salmon and tuna
  • Egg yolks and cheese
  • Food products with fortified with vitamin D including cereals, orange juice and yogurt.

OsteoNourish® for Ageless Bone Health

OsteoNourish® features a blend of multiple calcium sources such as calcium citrate, malate, gluconate, and aspartate, alongside the well-known vitamin D. This unique blend is chelated or firmly attached to promote absorption, and is easier to digest than other types. As a premium bone health formula, it also contains a multitude of other bone friendly nutrients such as magnesium, silica, Perluxan®† and FruiteX-B® Boron.

Maintaining bone and muscle health is important at all times, but it takes on a different meaning with the progression of age. Age can take a toll on bone density and strength, which is why it is important to ensure a steady supply of supportive nutrients through both diet and supplements. Doing so can help strengthen and support your bones and muscles!   

Click here to try OsteoNourish today!

 

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Lacking Daily Nutrients? Here’s Some Important Signs to Look For

Important signs to look for if you are lacking daily nutrients

A balanced diet is said to provide you with all of the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients you need each day. There are many processes in your body that need nutrients for areas like energy levels, heart health, blood sugar, skin and cell health, lungs, liver, and more. While nutrition is the means to good health many Americans continue to struggle receiving everything they need through their daily diet. So how do you know you’re missing key nutrients and what specifically should you look for?

Common Signs Your Missing Some Daily Nutrients

Three important nutrients you should focus on are magnesium, calcium, and potassium. Being deficient in these three can surface as muscle cramps, specifically in your toes, calves, back of legs, and even the arches of your feet. Magnesium deficiency is more common than you may think.

An estimated 80% of Americans may be deficient in magnesium, and even as a trace mineral it serves a wide range of healthy purposes. It helps create the necessary energy—ATP—your body needs, while aiding in the digestion of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. It also serves as a building block for RNA and DNA synthesis and acts as a precursor for certain neurotransmitters like serotonin, which is important for mood and a healthy sleep cycle.

Potassium's primary functions in the body include regulating fluid balance and controlling the electrical activity of the heart and other muscles. Potassium is an electrolyte that counteracts the effects of sodium, helping to maintain a healthy blood pressure levels.

Calcium is a well-known mineral needed by your bones. A Calcium magnesium balance is crucial. Too much calcium without enough magnesium can lead to muscle spasms, and additionally, to heart concerns. Some early signs of magnesium deficiency can also include a loss of appetite, headache, fatigue, and an overall feeling of weakness.

You May Not be Getting Enough of This Common Vitamin

Vitamin D is one of the most common vitamins in day to day health, but many Americans still remain deficient. Researchers estimate that 50 percent of the general population is at risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, and this percentage rises in higher-risk populations such as the elderly. It has been estimated that as many as 95% of senior certain may be deficient in vitamin D, due to factors like spending time indoors. For example, an underlying factor for seniors’ vitamin D deficiency can be that people over the age of 70 produces around 30% less vitamin D than a younger person with the same amount of skin exposure.

Signs that you may be deficient in Vitamin D can be weight gain, aches due to bones and joints, low moods, sweating and even gut discomfort. While you can receive plenty of vitamin D from sun exposure, that method comes with its own concerns as well. Luckily supplementation of vitamin D can allow you to receive the necessary amount you need. Some formulas will even combine the valuable trace minerals you need like magnesium and even calcium in one formula.

Regardless of any demographics, age, race, gender, or even weight, nutrients are a constant necessity for healthy living. Lack of nutrients can lead to certain symptoms which in turn can lead to other more serious health concerns when it comes to areas like the heart, blood pressure, blood sugar, weight management and more. Make sure you assess your daily health by checking to see if you have any symptoms that could mean a nutrients deficiency! Learn more and make the right choices to live healthy today!

 

References:

http://www.fitness.gov/eat-healthy/why-is-it-important/

http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/tdmarch2008pg39.shtml

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/11/03/nutrient-deficiency-signs-symptoms.aspx

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Changing Needs: A Focus on Age and Proper Nutrition

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Changing Needs: A Focus on Age and Proper NutritionMany people can recite the names of the most popular vitamins and prominent minerals such as vitamin A, D, calcium, and potassium. But are you getting enough each day? Many people are, in fact, missing some of the main nutrients needed to sustain healthy living—especially older adults. As diets change, the number of calories older adults absorb can drop. This can lead to a deficiency in some of the more vital nutrients that are needed for good health and increased longevity. To help you sustain ongoing health, here are some of the top nutrients you should look out for to help ensure that you’re getting the proper amounts.

Bones, Cells and Heart Health

Calcium is essential to supporting healthy bones and teeth. Bone development continues throughout adulthood, which is why your body needs a steady supply of calcium. Not getting enough calcium can lessen your bone density over time, leaving them brittle and making you more susceptible to falling and incurring injuries. Besides dairy products, broccoli and kale are also rich sources of calcium. You can also turn calcium supplementing into a treat by making a smoothie out of yogurt, fruit, and vegetables.

Along with helping maintain healthy nerve function, vitamin B12 helps in the formation of DNA, RNA, and red blood cells. B12 is especially important for older adults because they can’t absorb it as easily as younger people can. To get enough B12, eat plenty of fish, poultry, meat, eggs, and milk.

Folate, or folic acid, is another B vitamin (vitamin B9). Folic acid supplementation is recommended in pregnant women because adequate folate levels during pregnancy may help reduce the incidence of neural tube defects in babies. It has also been connected to protecting heart health and reducing risks of heart concerns later on in life. As one of the eight B-complex vitamins, folic acid helps convert the body’s food into fuel and is a crucial part of overall wellness.

Essential Nutrients for Internal Conditioning

Much has been written and debated about vitamin D. At its core it helps the body absorb calcium and is important to bone density, skin health, immune function, and many other processes in the body. While your skin is capable of producing some vitamin D when you’re exposed to the sun, many people do not spend enough time outdoors to satisfy the recommended daily value. Vitamin D amounts can vary by gender and age, but adults ages 19–70 should get, on average, at least 600 IU each day by remembering to step out in the sun or eating cereals, milk, and juices fortified with vitamin D.

Potassium is an electrolyte that helps your cells, tissues, and organs function properly. It is also connected to the electrical activity of the heart, and aids healthy blood pressure and kidney function. The daily requirement for potassium is 4,700 mg, which can be obtained from bananas, prunes, potatoes, dairy products, soy, and some fish.

While the body doesn’t need much magnesium, it still plays a crucial role in some 300 different processes in your body. Often associated with heart health, magnesium is also pertinent to a high-functioning immune system and bone health as 66% of the magnesium your body needs is stored in the bones. Although magnesium is found in many common foods such as grains and nuts, it is still estimated that people only get 66% of the necessary daily value. You can help make up for this deficit by eating more unprocessed foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, beans, and seeds.

Keeping Well Fed and Watered

Your digestive tract has a lot of responsibilities that include nutrient absorption, waste elimination, and immune health. Fiber, which is a type of carbohydrate that can’t be digested by the body, aids the digestive system. It is also known for supporting heart health. The national recommendation for fiber is 30–38 grams a day for men and 25 grams a day for women ages 18–50.

The last area of nutrition that is often overlooked is hydration. Fluids are an important part of your diet; water being the most crucial. As you get older your sense of thirst can decline, but no matter what age you are, hydration is important for every process mentioned in the above paragraphs. It is often said that if food is your body’s fuel, then fluid is the coolant. Nutritionists recommend drinking 3–5 large glasses of water each day, or 8 glasses if you’re physically active.

Covering Your Bases of Nutrients

Sometimes keeping track of what your body needs can seem overwhelming. However, if you’ve already made the decision to eat healthier by managing your food groups and portions, you can easily figure out what vitamins and minerals you are getting enough of, and what areas you may need to focus on. Supplementation for many vitamins and minerals is always a viable option due to the various nature of different diets. Getting a wide variety of what you need, at each point in the aging process, however, is crucial to continued healthy living, and it starts with what you know.

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Be Upbeat When It Comes to Heart Health

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https://www.gardavita.com/content/images/thumbs/0000217_daily-multichew-bogo-2x-bottles.jpegAll this month of February America celebrates the amazing human heart with Heart-Health Awareness Month. While heart health consistently ranks as the top health concern in the nation, new research indicates that there are more and more everyday things you can do to sway it in a more positive direction.

Yes, You Can!

The first step in any lifestyle change is having the right attitude. A study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes on 600 patients found that those who took the initiative to exercise and turn their health around significantly increased their life expectancy. Another study in the American Journal of Cardiology also found that having an upbeat attitude actually protected people from heart health risks. A large part of staying positive includes reducing stress. Research published in both the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism and Archives of Internal Medicine found that stress and its associated hormones can put added pressure on your heart. So if you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, take time to unwind by engaging in relaxing activities such as reading a book, spending time with friends, or participating in physical activities.

Get Moving

Depending on various factors like age and doctor-recommended restrictions, physical activity is anything that gets you moving to burn calories. From climbing stairs to organized sports, staying active can support a healthy heart and aid circulation. At the very least, start walking; it’s fun, easy, and a sociable exercise. An article in the journal, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, states that walking can help normalize blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels.

Nutrition You Can Live By

Your diet plays an important role in supporting a healthy heart. Even simple things, such as remembering to eat a healthy breakfast, can help lower cardio health risks according to one Harvard study. Certain foods, when added to your diet, aid various aspects such as cholesterol, blood pressure, and weight management. Fish such as salmon, tuna, trout, herring, and mackerel contain omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to help lower blood pressure and triglycerides that can help maintain healthy cholesterol levels. The American Heart Association recommends eating these types of fish at least two times a week. Kidney beans or black beans can also be good sources omega-3 fatty acids as well as niacin, folate, magnesium, calcium, and soluble fiber. Even foods like yogurt and supplements containing probiotics have been studied recently for their cholesterol-lowering effects. Besides adding more nutritious foods to your diet, it’s important to cut back on the ones that push your heart health in the wrong direction. One observational study published in BMC Medicine found that cutting back on processed meat consumption to less than 20 grams per day could lower mortality rates by 3.3%. Lowering your consumption of red meat can also lower levels of amino acids that have been linked to heart concerns.

Healthy Snacking

Snacking doesn’t need to be the bane of your diet. Healthy snacks such as almonds and walnuts also contain omega-3s as well as fiber, folate, and magnesium that can boost your nutrition. Oatmeal, whole grains, and flaxseed can provide vitamins, minerals, and nutrients like magnesium, potassium, folate, niacin, calcium, and soluble fiber. Of course, a consistently healthy diet revolves around choosing lots of fruits and vegetables on a regular basis. Avoid fried foods, and foods and drinks with added sugars.

No Ifs, Ands, or “Butts” About It

Enough can’t be said on how much quitting smoking can boost heart health. But if you or someone you know needs yet another to convince them on how much their health can improve by quitting smoking, take a look at this study presented at a meeting held by the American Heart Association: It found that people who smoked fewer than 3.2 packs of cigarettes a day for 10 years could lower their heart illness risk to the same level as nonsmokers in eight years. Even heavy smokers who quit could improve their life expectancy by 35%.

The Power to Change Is in Everyone’s Hands

Some factors such as hereditary genes may be beyond your control, but by believing that you have the power to change your health and by following through with those changes, the power of positive thinking can go a long way. If the state of your heart is weighing heavily on your mind, adopt an upbeat attitude, be more active, eat healthier, and say goodbye to bad habits. Keep your heart in mind this February—and throughout your lifetime—by taking the steps towards greater well-being today!


Omega3Q10
 
 

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From Body to Brain to Bones, Just How Important Is Vitamin D?

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From Body to Brain to Bones, Just How Important Is Vitamin D?Vitamin D is a vital component to many areas of your health including bone density, muscle strength, immune health, brain function, and more. However, as recently as 2009 it was reported that nearly three-quarters of all teens and adults in US are vitamin D deficient. This is a critical area to address as the consequences can have far-ranging effects on your overall health.

Sun to Skin

Your body’s skin cells are able to produce vitamin D every time you step out into the sun, so it stands to reason that vitamin D should be easy to obtain. But those with darker skin and people who spend a lot on time indoors or in darker regions, may have a harder time absorbing enough sunlight to produce a proper amount of vitamin D. It is recommended to spend 15 to 30 minutes a few days a week outside in direct sunlight. However, UV rays can be harmful so health experts don’t often advise getting Vitamin D from sun exposure.

Just How Important Is Vitamin D?

Vitamin D is important right down to the core of your health. It influences everything from aiding calcium absorption for strong bones to supporting muscles and teeth. Vitamin D can also influence heart health. It has been studied for its ability to support healthy blood pressure levels, and promote healthy arteries and circulation. Recent studies have shown that it can also influence your auto-immune system’s health, aiding your body’s natural defenses. If supporting almost every aspect of your body wasn’t enough, vitamin D has also shown its merit in supporting the brain. Several studies have shown that sufficient levels of vitamin D can support brain function and cognitive health. It seems there is nothing this multipurpose vitamin can’t do, but are you getting enough?

Where Do I Get Vitamin D and How Much Do I Need?

Eating a healthy and balanced diet containing cereals and low-fat milk fortified with vitamin D can be a great way to start off your day. Many brands of orange juice also contain added vitamin D; just be wary of additives and sugar content. For dinner, if you’re looking to boost your vitamin D intake, certain fish, especially mackerel, salmon, tuna, and sardines can all provide healthy amounts of vitamin D. In addition, foods like eggs (especially the yolks), cheese, and yogurt can all help fortify your diet with the recommended amounts of vitamin D. How much you need depends on you as an individual. Age, nationality, and where you live can all factor into your recommended daily amount. While there is still some debate on how much vitamin D you should take, allowances ranging up to 4,000 IU’s a day are generally considered safe. For those who may have trouble getting enough vitamin D through their diet there are also many vitamin D supplements that can satisfy your daily needs. So be sure to stay up to date on how much you need, and continue to make the choices that give you all the nutrition you need to remain healthy each day!


Vitamin D
 

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