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Blog posts tagged with 'bones'

Three Powerful Supplements Are Leading the Way in Joint Health – Are You on Board?

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Three Powerful Supplements Are Leading the Way in Joint Health – Are You on Board?Many people today experience some form of bone and joint discomfort. Even if you don't have a physically demanding job, your chances of dealing with joint discomfort—from mild stiffness to constant soreness during everyday activities—can increase throughout your lifetime simply from normal use. However, while you may initially assume that joint discomfort is an inevitable part of aging, more and more health experts are saying this doesn't need to be the case.

What's Really Happening?

The main cause for discomfort begins in the joints. The space between the bones needs cushioning to prevent bones from rubbing up against each other at the points of contact. Buffering these joints is the all-important substance, cartilage. Cartilage is a connective tissue that can be found throughout the body: From your ears, to your nose, to your rib cage, and the vertebrae in your back. This fibrous tissue keeps your body structure together, yet provides flexibility and mobility you need. The first step in attempting to find relief is to understand what's really going on in your bones and joints. According to Raymond Gaeta, M.D., of the Stanford Hospital & Clinic at Stanford University, people are used to the body healing itself naturally, so they always expect that to happen. In reality, similar to how a car requires regular maintenance and lubrication, keeping your bones and joints healthy at any age involves proper nutrition, consisting of vitamins and nutrients that help strengthen and lubricate them. Lack of these nutrients can start to manifest as symptoms of discomfort that “affects how you handle your life, your livelihood, and your interactions with family and friends,” according to Dr. Gaeta.

The Power of Three: Glucosamine, Chondroitin, and Fish Oil

Besides supplementing your diet with the usual FDA-recommended vitamins and minerals, your bones and joints can also benefit from other joint health ingredients. Glucosamine, chondroitin, and fish oil are three joint health supplements that can provide some of the best mobility support and discomfort relief available. Glucosamine has been shown in studies to maintain the integrity of your joints by strengthening cartilage. It has been shown that the body uses glucosamine to help synthesize and repair cartilage. Glucosamine has also been shown to be highly beneficial for keeping cartilage tissue lubricated, allowing for better mobility and flexibility in joints. When taken as a supplement it has shown evidence of relieving discomfort due to inflammation as well. Chondroitin sulfate is also naturally found in the cartilage. It acts as a building material by donating sulfur bonds that are used in cartilage production. As a supplement, chondroitin is commonly partnered with glucosamine to help relieve inflammation that can lead to discomfort, and support cartilage production and repair. Fish oil contains the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, which have also been found to help ease inflammation in joint tissue. In a recent, large-scale research study published in the Journal of Epidemiology it was found that regular use of glucosamine, chondroitin, and fish oil supplements can reduce markers of inflammation by up to 22%. In addition to being highly effective, the researchers also noted that the supplements were highly safe to take.

The Right Nutrition for Protection

A recent survey found that nearly 1 in 5 (19%) American adults were experiencing joint discomfort. Among these people surveyed, half did not know what caused their discomfort. If you're one of these people, pinpointing where these concerns might come from and learning what you can do to support the health of your joints, bones, and cartilage can rejuvenate the healthy lifestyle you desire. Discomfort and mobility challenges do not have to be an accepted part of aging. Getting your mobility and flexibility back can be within your control. Support your joint health and fuel your body the right nutrients today!


Triple-Strength Glucosamine Chondroitin
 

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The ABCs of Health: How Well Do You Know Your Vitamins?

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The ABCs of Health: How Well Do You Know Your Vitamins?Essential vitamins and minerals are vital to everyday health. Interestingly, the uses of many essential vitamins were discovered only when people observed the effects that their deficiencies caused. The more we understand about our health the more we realize our minds and bodies need proper daily support to function properly. How much do you know about the essential vitamins and minerals you need each day?

ACE Nutrition

Vitamin A (as known as retinol or beta-carotene) is said to help build good vision and promote bone development. It has antioxidant properties to support immune and cellular health. Vitamin C, also an antioxidant, is a water-soluble vitamin that is important for building connective tissues (such as joint cartilage and collagen), bones, and teeth. It assists in metabolizing other vitamins and is vital to proper immune system function. Vitamin E helps maintain healthy cells and may help promote cognitive function. Like vitamins A and C, it also functions as an antioxidant. Studies have shown that combinations of vitamin A, C, and E help protect the macula, the region of the eye that is integral for detailed vision. All three nutrients can be found in many different foods, so you aren't limited for choice:

  • Vitamin A – Sweet potatoes, beef liver, fruits and eggs.
  • Vitamin C – Citrus fruits, peppers, and greens like broccoli.
  • Vitamin E – Whole grains, nuts, and spinach.

Being Healthy Doesn't Need to "B" Complex

The B-complex vitamins are mostly concerned with energy production in your body. Vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), and B6 all help metabolize or produce energy. Vitamin B1 helps metabolize carbohydrates, while B3 releases energy from carbohydrates and fats. Vitamin B2 assists in energy production and red blood cell formation, while B6 supports nervous system function. Red blood cells are vital in transporting fresh oxygen to every part of your body and taking carbon dioxide back to the lungs. Another important B vitamin is B9 (folic acid). Folic acid is known to support a healthy brain and heart, and it also synthesizes proteins and DNA. Folic acid can be found in green, leafy vegetables and whole grains. A study done at the Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, on B vitamins as biomarkers showed favorable results for supporting cognitive health and brain function with folic acid.

D + Calcium = Healthy Bones

Vitamin D and calcium are two of the most important vitamins and minerals for the integrity of your bones and teeth. Even though vitamin D is quite well known, recent reports say many people still aren't getting enough. Research shows that, worldwide, an estimated 1 billion people have inadequate levels of vitamin D in their blood, and deficiencies can be found in all ethnicities and age groups. Vital to healthy bones and immune function, vitamin D can be produced in skin cells whenever you're exposed to UV rays from sunlight. Despite this fact, people may still not be getting enough sun exposure due to location and skin being concealed by clothing. Vitamin D also aids the absorption of calcium and phosphorus. Together, all three nutrients keep your internal structure strong and healthy.

"Zinc" Hard About Other Nutrients

Once you've checked off all the letter-vitamins on your nutrition list, don't forget to include minerals in your diet, too. Trace minerals such as iron and selenium are all important to your daily health, albeit in small doses. Iron is necessary to produce the hemoglobin found in red blood cells. Recent studies have also highlighted the importance of iron in brain development, showing it is needed for the mind as well. Selenium is an antioxidant that helps protect cells from free radical damage. Zinc is an essential mineral to many different bodily processes. Most notably it supports immune function. A recent study looked at the role that both vitamin C and zinc play in boosting immune health. Results showed that supplementation with a combination of zinc and vitamin C "was found to improve components of the human immune system such as antimicrobial and natural killer cell activities."

Multitask Your Nutrition with a Multivitamin

Keeping track of all the amounts and types of vitamins you need to take each day can be exhausting, but it's worth the effort because of all the ways they can positively influence your health. Luckily there are multivitamin supplements out there that can help you reach the recommended daily value of all these essentials. Multivitamins are often called a daily insurance policy on nutrition. By understanding the basics and where to get them, you can stay one step ahead in fortifying good, daily nutrition for healthy living.


Daily MultiChew
 
 

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From Body to Brain to Bones, Just How Important Is Vitamin D?

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From Body to Brain to Bones, Just How Important Is Vitamin D?Vitamin D is a vital component to many areas of your health including bone density, muscle strength, immune health, brain function, and more. However, as recently as 2009 it was reported that nearly three-quarters of all teens and adults in US are vitamin D deficient. This is a critical area to address as the consequences can have far-ranging effects on your overall health.

Sun to Skin

Your body’s skin cells are able to produce vitamin D every time you step out into the sun, so it stands to reason that vitamin D should be easy to obtain. But those with darker skin and people who spend a lot on time indoors or in darker regions, may have a harder time absorbing enough sunlight to produce a proper amount of vitamin D. It is recommended to spend 15 to 30 minutes a few days a week outside in direct sunlight. However, UV rays can be harmful so health experts don’t often advise getting Vitamin D from sun exposure.

Just How Important Is Vitamin D?

Vitamin D is important right down to the core of your health. It influences everything from aiding calcium absorption for strong bones to supporting muscles and teeth. Vitamin D can also influence heart health. It has been studied for its ability to support healthy blood pressure levels, and promote healthy arteries and circulation. Recent studies have shown that it can also influence your auto-immune system’s health, aiding your body’s natural defenses. If supporting almost every aspect of your body wasn’t enough, vitamin D has also shown its merit in supporting the brain. Several studies have shown that sufficient levels of vitamin D can support brain function and cognitive health. It seems there is nothing this multipurpose vitamin can’t do, but are you getting enough?

Where Do I Get Vitamin D and How Much Do I Need?

Eating a healthy and balanced diet containing cereals and low-fat milk fortified with vitamin D can be a great way to start off your day. Many brands of orange juice also contain added vitamin D; just be wary of additives and sugar content. For dinner, if you’re looking to boost your vitamin D intake, certain fish, especially mackerel, salmon, tuna, and sardines can all provide healthy amounts of vitamin D. In addition, foods like eggs (especially the yolks), cheese, and yogurt can all help fortify your diet with the recommended amounts of vitamin D. How much you need depends on you as an individual. Age, nationality, and where you live can all factor into your recommended daily amount. While there is still some debate on how much vitamin D you should take, allowances ranging up to 4,000 IU’s a day are generally considered safe. For those who may have trouble getting enough vitamin D through their diet there are also many vitamin D supplements that can satisfy your daily needs. So be sure to stay up to date on how much you need, and continue to make the choices that give you all the nutrition you need to remain healthy each day!


Vitamin D
 

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Can You Guess Which Ordinary Fruit Is as Nutritious as the Trending ‘Superfruits’?

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Can You Guess Which Ordinary Fruit Is as Nutritious as the Trending ‘Superfruits’?Fruits have long been touted as a necessary staple of our daily diet and nutrition needs. But according to experts, we aren’t getting enough. The USDA recommended serving of fruit—depending on your age—is at least 2 cups a day. The benefits of natural fruits are nothing short of wondrous, but every month there seems to be a new “superfruit” trend being hailed as the best fruit around. Often forgotten is one of the go-to staples that we have relied upon for years: the apple. While it may not be as glamorous or exotic-sounding as the acai berry, pomegranate, papaya, or kumquat (all of which are nutritious in their own right) an apple contains just as many vitamins and nutrients to give you the boost you need from your daily fruit intake.

Plentiful Benefits from a Familiar Fruit

A simple apple has many nutritional benefits. As a handy and relatively inexpensive snack a medium apple contains around only 80 calories and is fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. It can also support a healthy immune system because of its vitamin C content. A single apple holds enough nutritional value to cover half of your daily recommended intake of fruit!

Nutrition is Skin Deep

Many of the nutritional benefits of an apple can be derived from its skin. The skin of an apple can contain up to 3.3 grams of fiber. This type of dietary fiber can help support healthy cholesterol levels, aid digestion, and keep you feeling fuller for longer. Apple skins also contain a high amount of the antioxidant, quercetin, which can help protect against free radical damage. Quercetin is a phytochemical possessing anti-inflammatory qualities that can be beneficial to your heart. Apples can be seamlessly integrated into your daily diet because they make for such a convenient and inexpensive snack that can last longer than most fruits. An apple kept in a bag in your refrigerator can stay fresh up to three weeks.

Covering the Crucial Areas of Your Daily Nutrition

The USDA guidelines for fruits and other food groups exist to help steer you towards making healthier food choices. Apples can be a tasty, nutritious way of complementing your daily intake of nutrients that your body needs for top performance and overall health maintenance. But if you’re on a diet that restricts the type of food you can eat, you don’t like a particular food group, or you simply don’t have time to eat healthy meals all of the time, you may not be getting all the nutrition you need. Supplementing your diet with the proper antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals is a perfect way to fill in the nutritional gaps regardless of your eating habits. Balance is always important and making sure you get sufficient levels of essential daily nutrients can be vital to supporting a healthier way of life.


Daily MultiChew
 

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How Much Vitamin D Do You Need? It Can Depend on Your Race

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How Much Vitamin D Do You Need? It Can Depend on Your RaceVitamins have many roles in human health and vitamin D is no exception. Although it’s closely associated with calcium absorption and bone health, vitamin D has also been linked to the immune system and cardiovascular health. The Food and Drug Administration has recommended guidelines on how much vitamin D people should get, but these levels can vary by fitness, gender, and even race. In a new study examining the role of vitamin D in heart health, researchers found that low vitamin D levels may increase the risk of heart health challenges in white and Chinese ethnicities, but not in blacks or Hispanics.

Genes May Be a Factor

The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), was an observational paper pulled from data on over 6,400 patients enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). MESA is one of the most diverse, long-term studies on heart health among different ethnic groups in the United States. Vitamin D is produced naturally in skin cells from sun exposure. Races with less melanin (or pigment cells) tend to produce more vitamin D than blacks or Hispanics under the same amount of light exposure. According to Dr. Cassianne Robinson-Cohen, the lead author of the JAMA paper, “We don’t know for sure, but perhaps genes affecting the need for and use of vitamin D could have evolved to adapt to different levels of sun exposure in places where various ethnic subgroups of people originated.” One of the key findings that researchers noticed was that while blacks and Hispanics may have higher rates of developing heart health challenges, low vitamin D did not appear to be a significant factor. This may be because their bodies have adapted to metabolizing vitamin D differently.

It’s the Little Differences That Count

One of the most important things to take home from the study is that a one-size-fits-all approach to treatments seldom works. Increasing white or Chinese patients’ vitamin D dosage to support their heart health may be effective for them, but taking the same approach to black or Hispanic patients may have little effect. Dr. Michael Lauer, director of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute’s Division of Cardiovascular Sciences that funded the MESA study, hopes that the report “underscores the value of conducting studies that include participants from diverse backgrounds. The MESA investigators have presented a finding that could serve as a foundation for future research on the possible link between vitamin D blood levels and heart health.” Studies like these may also lead to more personalized nutritional recommendations of vitamin D and other nutrients, so that future populations may get essential levels of vitamins and minerals that are truly essential to them.


Mega Probiotic

 

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