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Blog posts tagged with 'Sports'

What Is in That Energy Drink and Is It Worth the Trade-Off?

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What Is in That Energy Drink and Is It Worth the Trade-Off?Despite national health movements encouraging people to lead healthier lifestyles, consumption of energy drinks continues to rise. According to data compiled by Bloomberg last year, energy drink sales increased nearly 7%, reaching $9.2 billion by the end of 2013. From office workers to athletes, people are consuming energy beverages for a variety of reasons. But are they really that helpful?

Measuring Effective Performance

A recent study on energy drinks carried out by experts from Camilo José Cela University (UCJC) sought to analyze the positive and negative effects they may have on athletes. In the study, top athletes who participated in various sports including soccer, climbing, swimming, basketball, rugby, tennis, and hockey were given the equivalent of three cans of energy drink or a placebo energy drink before their competitions. Their performance was then measured with GPS devices which tracked their average speed and distance covered. Other devices were used to track muscle usage in certain sports. Results of the study showed a minimal 3%-7% percent increase in total performance for those who had taken the energy drinks. However the results were not all positive.

An Unhealthy Trade-Off

While an increase in performance was noted, it was not without a cost. Athletes that took the energy drinks before their competitions also experienced an increased frequency of insomnia, along with nervousness and an inability to calm down after their activities. The placebo group did not show the same signs or frequency of any negative side-effects such as nervousness, anxiety, or insomnia as those who were given the energy drinks.

Other studies done on the short-term physical effects of energy drink consumption showed alterations in short-term heart function. Researchers took cardiac MRIs of 15 healthy men and three healthy women with an average age of 27.5 years before and one hour after they consumed an energy drink containing 400 mg/100 ml taurine and 32mg/100 ml caffeine. Comparing MRI images, researchers discovered that there was increased strain on the left ventricle in the "after" images.

While more research about the long-term effects of energy drinks on the heart and body in general is needed, study author Dr. Jonas Dörner from the University of Bonn, Germany, commented that it was clear that energy drinks can affect short-term heart function.

Choosing a Path to Healthy Energy

While public scrutiny often falls on the soft drink beverage industry, the ingredients in energy drinks do not vastly differ. Some energy drinks contain up to three times the amount of caffeine as a normal cup of coffee. As recently as 2013, a group of 18 doctors jointly urged the FDA to restrict the amount of caffeine companies were allowed to put into energy drinks as reported in the NY Times.

When looking for a healthy source of energy—whether it's for exercise or help you endure the work day—it's important to be aware of how these sources can affect your body. Instead of constantly turning to caffeine or sugar-filled foods or beverages, choose foods high in fiber or proteins such as eggs, nuts (including trail mix), and whole-grain cereal for longer, more sustained energy. When it comes to beverages stay hydrated with plain old H2O. Water helps transport nutrients through the blood and can support the efficient removal of waste that can build up and lead to fatigue during exercise.

For the healthy, long-lasting energy your body needs, be sure to choose the right fuel. Proper nutrition and hydration can provide the right daily balance to help keep your energy levels where you need them all day long.

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A Joint Effort: Tips to Help Influence Healthy Joints

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A Joint Effort: Tips to Help Influence Healthy JointsThe importance of supporting healthy joints throughout your lifetime is no secret. Many factors—from exercise to diet to lifestyle—are discussed at length when it comes to how and why you should take care of the joints that are tied so intricately to your overall well-being. But the fact remains that many people still suffer from joint stiffness and discomfort. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), as of 2012 nearly 52 million people are diagnosed as having a common type of joint concern. While natural wear and tear on your joints and muscles occurs throughout your life, taking some minute daily precautions can be the difference between ultimately helping or hurting the health of your joints.

To Stretch or Not to Stretch?

It's hard on your body to expect your joints and muscles to go from zero to fully exercising, but in the same respect stretching cold joints, muscles, and tendons is not good either. Even if you're not about to exercise you should stretch daily, or at least three times a week, to maintain joint flexibility. However, warming up before doing some dynamic stretches to keep your joints, ligaments, and tendons loose is necessary.

Warming up literally means raising your body temperature a little before stretching and exercising. Jogging in place, rotating your arms, or even moving your body around can help you warm up to properly stretch and allow you to protect your joints from injury when you eventually engage in physical activity.

Low-Impact Exercise Still Has an Impact

As you get older, joint discomfort may mentally deter you from being physically active. While everyone's limitations change as they get older, it's important to know that even if you have joint concerns there are low-impact exercises that can cater to your capabilities and still allow you to get the exercise your body needs.

Walking, cycling, and swimming are some of the main types of low-impact exercises. Different types of sports can be jarring on your joints, but these simple ways of moving about without the high impact of your joints stomping the ground can provide a good cardiovascular workout while giving your joints the movement they need to stay in shape.

Other Helpful Tips for Keeping Joints Healthy

Sometimes joint health isn't just about focusing on your joints. Light exercises for muscles around crucial joints can actually help strengthen the joints themselves. Research has shown that having weaker thigh muscles can increase the risk of joint concerns. In addition to the muscles around your joints, make sure to workout your core. Having a strong core, midsection, and back can help you have better balance and a fuller range of motion, allowing you to put less pressure on joints.

Supplementation can also give your joints the well-rounded support they need. Ingredients like hyaluronic acid can help lubricate the joints to support mobility and flexibility while collagen, a main component of joints and skin, helps nourish cartilage to keep the connective tissues strong. MSM is another well-known ingredient for joint support as it supports tissue rejuvenation, nourishes cartilage, and is a major key for collagen production and overall joint support.

Understanding the Ins and Outs of Joints

To understand joint health is to know how the rest of your body is connected to movement. Just because you may experience joint discomfort, it should not be a reason to give up all hope for engaging in some type of consistent exercise. Of course, it is always important to know your limitations and be sure to check with your doctor before pushing your boundaries. Giving your joints the support they need is possible through both internal and external factors. Exercise, nutrition, and understanding how to best protect your joints can lead you to the healthy and active lifestyle you need.

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