FREE STANDARD SHIPPING on orders $35+
15% off & FREE STANDARD SHIPPING on orders $120+
1 year money back guarantee
cGMP
Close
Search
Filters
RSS

Blog posts of '2013' 'January'

Healthy Produce Isn’t As Healthy As It Used to Be

Share

Healthy Produce Isn’t As Healthy As It Used to BeFruits and vegetables are generally regarded as the most nutritious foods you could eat as part of a balanced diet. In most cases, people don’t get enough servings of them. However, some health experts are saying that even if you consume the FDA-recommended servings of fruits and vegetables daily, a lot of that produce may not be as nutritious as you think. Compared to produce grown about 50 years ago, today’s fruits and vegetables have less nutritional content even though they’ve been engineered to yield larger crops. Dan Kittredge, a farmer and director of the Bionutrient Food Association, found that overuse of pesticides, and not allowing soil to rest and recover vital nutrients is mostly to blame.

More Nutrients in Soil = More Nutritious Foods

Nutrient-rich soil translates to higher nutritional content in produce, and better flavor as well according to Kittredge. Taste tests from many top chefs agree with Kittredge’s assessment. Incidentally, soil with more nutrients also had fewer pest infestations, reducing the need for pesticides. Instead of engineering plants and seeds to grow larger, Kittredge gives annual seminars that teach farmers about biology, hydrology, irrigation, and other aspects of farming that emphasize soil richening to produce higher-quality crops and higher crop yields. His methods have resulted in some farmers boasting shorter harvest times, larger yields, and fewer pest attacks. Phil Jones and Don Hess are two such individuals who have attended Kittredge’s seminars and applied his methods to their farms. Jones has noticed not only an increase in crop number, but a noticeable improvement in flavor and texture. Hess echoes these statements and notes that the output of his farm has almost doubled thanks to the improved growing techniques.

Not All Produce Is Equal

Most of us don’t have the pleasure of obtaining fresh produce from local farms using Kittredge’s techniques. However, you can make up for the nutrients that you’re lacking in your diet with nutritional supplements such as a daily multivitamin that provides balanced servings of essential vitamins and minerals. Good health is a result of healthy choices, so choose wisely when it comes to taking care of your body!

References:

Share

Frailty Not a Necessary Part of Aging

Share

Frailty Not a Necessary Part of AgingA lot of people associate old age with loss of speed, strength, energy, and mobility; aka frailty. But according to a growing number of physicians—including internist and geriatrician Ava Kaufman—that doesn't have to be the case. "Frailty is not an age, it's a condition," says Kaufman. Like any medical condition, it's characterized by a group of symptoms that occur together. Although the elderly are more susceptible to frailty, old age is not a guarantee that one will end up frail.

Inflammation Increases Risk of Frailty

Americans are living longer, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they're living healthier. About 4% of men and 7% of women over age 65 are frail, but that number rises sharply to about 25% after age 85. Women are more likely to be frail because they have less muscle mass and are more prone to bone loss. Researchers believe that there are a number of underlying reasons why an individual can become frail. Inflammation, for example, can weaken bones and muscles. The inability to process glucose can also lead to a buildup of the stress hormone, cortisol, which also damages skeletal muscle and weakens the immune system.

Staying Active Is Key to Being Healthier

However, researchers point out that many preliminary studies show that moderate physical activity may help reduce walking problems and improve mobility. Exercise need not be strenuous, especially if a patient's joints and muscles are already weak. Instead of high-impact jogging, for example, a person can opt for a slow-paced, 30-minute walk and light weights. Many frail individuals are also malnourished, so their bodies lack the basic nutrients to support their bone and muscle health. That's why nutritious eating habits are a must not only for the young and active, but anyone who wants to maintain a long, healthy lifestyle. Age brings greater responsibility and wisdom, but it doesn't have to include weakness and poorer health, especially if you start practicing healthier habits when you're younger.

References:

Share

Perceived Stress May Indicate the State of Your Heart Health

Share

Perceived Stress May Indicate the State of Your Heart HealthStress has been linked to a number of negative health effects such sleeplessness, poor memory, and even poor appetite. Among the more serious health concerns it’s been associated with is heart health. A recent analysis of multiple studies found that people with higher stress had a higher risk of developing cardiovascular health challenges. Participants were asked questions such as “How stressed do you feel?” or “How often are you stressed?” Those who scored higher (i.e. those who felt very stressed and were stressed often) had a 27% increase in cardio health risks.

Stress Almost As Bad As Smoking

In their paper, published in the American Journal of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center researchers looked at six different studies that involved nearly 120,000 participants over a 14-year period. Their data indicated that the detrimental effects of stress were nearly as bad as smoking more than five cigarettes a day. Stress not only wears down a person emotionally; it can also raise blood pressure and LDL cholesterol levels. Elevated blood pressure forces your heart to work harder to circulate blood throughout your body while LDL cholesterol can narrow blood vessels, which also hinders circulation.

Risk Increases with Age

While gender didn’t appear to be a factor in who was more likely to be affected by stress, age did. Among the people who had higher stress levels, the older they were the greater their risk of heart health challenges. Researchers speculated that this was because these individuals may have been living with stress longer, so it had more long-term effects to their blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The mind can have a great influence over the body and how you feel about yourself can affect how you feel physically. If stress is getting to you, find a means to deal with it sooner rather than later so that the effects don’t lead up to negative consequences. Take up a new hobby, socialize with friends, and most important of all: relax.

References:

Share